Phil Monroe, Psy.D.

In the 21st century United States, does spiritual abuse really happen? Can’t we all just choose churches where we feel safe? No one makes us (adults) go to church, so shouldn’t spiritual abuse be nonexistent in this day—or at least happen only once (e.g., fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice…)?

Sadly, spiritual abuse happens in all sorts of churches and for all sorts of reasons.

What is spiritual abuse?

Spiritual abuse is the use of faith, belief, and/or religious practices to coerce, control, or damage another for a purpose beyond the victim’s well-being (i.e., church discipline for the purpose of love of the offender need not be abuse).

Like child abuse, spiritual abuse comes in many forms. It can take the form of neglect or intentional harm of another. It can take the form of naïve manipulation or predatory “feeding on the sheep.” Consider some of these examples:

  • Refusing to provide pastoral care to women on the basis of gender alone
  • Coercing reconciliation of victim to offender
  • Dictating basic decisions (marriage, home ownership, jobs, giving practices, etc.)
  • Binding conscience on matters that are in the realm of Christian freedom
  • Using threats to maintain control of another
  • Using deceptive language to coerce into sexual activity
  • Denying the right to divorce despite having grounds to do so

For a short review, consider Mary DeMuth’s 2011 post on 10 Ways to Spot Spiritual Abuse.

Why is it so harmful?

If someone demands your wallet, you may give it, but you do not think they have a right to it. You have no doubt that an injustice has occurred. You have been robbed! When someone abuses, it is a robbery, but often wrapped up in a deceptive package to make the victim feel as if the robbery was actually a gift. Spiritual abuse almost always is couched in several layers of deception. Here’s a few of those layers:

  •  Speaking falsely for God. Spiritual leaders or shepherds abuse most frequently by presenting their words as if they were the words of God himself. They may not say “Thus sayeth the Lord” in so many ways, but they speak with authority. When leaders fail to communicate God’s words and attitudes, they are called false teachers and prophets. Some of these false words include squelching dissent and concern in the name of “unity.”
  • Over-emphasizing one doctrinal point while minimizing another. Consider the example of Paul, “Follow my example as I follow the example of Christ” (1 Cor 11:1). In three other places in the NT, Paul says similar phrases. The application is that our leaders are to exemplify the character of Christ. Sadly, it is easy to turn this into “do what I want you to do.” Paul does not say to imitate him. He says to imitate him when he imitates Christ. There are other examples as well: forcing forgiveness, demanding victims of abuse to confront their abusers in private so that they will meet the letter of Matthew 18, and so forth.
  • Good ends justifying means. It is a sad fact that many victims of other kinds of abuse have been asked to be silent for the sake of community comfort. Indeed, community comfort is important. But forcing a victim of abuse to be silent and to forego seeking justice is a form of spiritual abuse.
  • Pretending to provide pastoral care. I have talked with several pastors who crossed into sexual behavior with those they have been charged to counsel. All too commonly, the pastor deceived himself and other into thinking that the special attention given to the parishioner was love and compassion. In fact, their actions were always self-serving. However, the layer of deception made it feel (to both parties) like love in the beginning stages.

The reason why spiritual abuse hurts so much is that it always fosters confusion, self-doubt, and shame. This recipe encourages isolation, self-hatred, and questioning of God. When shepherds abuse, the sheep are scattered and confused. They no longer discern the voice of the true Shepherd.

This is exactly why the Old Testament and New Testament speak in such harsh terms against abusive and neglectful shepherds (see Ezekiel 34:2; Jeremiah 50:6; John 10:9). Words like, “Woe to you…” and “You blind guides…” reveal that spiritual abuse for any reason is destructive and is not of God. And it gets no harsher than, “Better than a millstone be tied to your neck and thrown into the sea” to illustrate the depth of evil in harming vulnerable people.

 Talk Back: Have you encountered or confronted spiritual abuse in your work as a Christian counselor? Share your thoughts and feedback by leaving a comment below.

 

Phil Monroe is Professor of Counseling & Psychology and Director of the Masters of Arts in Counseling Program at Biblical Seminary. He also directs Biblical’s new trauma recovery project. You can find his personal blog at www.wisecounsel.wordpress.com.


Choosing to see black and blue | Minnesota Prairie Roots · March 16, 2015 at 6:00 am

[…] While I still cannot see a black and blue dress, the message is absolutely clear to me. We all need to start seeing domestic abuse in all its forms. Sometimes the abuse is visible. Often it is not. Emotional abuse (lies, manipulation, controlling behavior, etc.) is even more common than physical abuse. Domestic abuse can also take the form of spiritual abuse. […]

Reformed "Spotlight": Spiritual Abuse Resources | HeadHeartHand Blog · April 25, 2016 at 2:02 am

[…] Spiritual Abuse: What it is and why it hurts | Phil Monroe […]

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